Saturday, December 28, 2013

Meet the artist #43

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Obidinah Heavner

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I chose this for the drama! the intrigue! and the first turning point in the story “Ocho Loved Flowers.” It is also suggestive of a well-known theme in children’s lives. What is under the bed?  Come to think of it, it's probably a lifelong theme.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
SCBWI means a few things to me, such as I feel I’m really part of a family full of quirky, good-hearted, creative people who have a special understanding of childhood and children. It is also a reliable source I can to go to for professionalism and the business of publishing.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
A Child’s Garden of Verses. I still remember “The gingham dog and the calico cat, side by side at the table sat….” Also Blueberries for Sal, in which I could almost smell the salty sea air and feel the cold and wind of being on the water, even though I was living in Colorado at the time. Oh! and The Make It Book. It had a project on one or two pages and my sister and I did sooooo many of them.

Fun fact: Obidinah began working in Norway. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Friday, December 27, 2013

Thank You, Tina Claus!

Hey you illustrators, it looks like our show at the Convention Center is on track to get 5000 views on the STQRY app! Can you believe that? When was the last time one of your pieces got 5000 views? I know some of you vets have been so fortunate (and talented), but for me, this is a BIG, BIG first! I want to thank Tina Hoggatt for the ton of hard work she put in behind the scenes to make this show happen in the first place and then to make sure we got the recognition and views! Let's hear a big, fat huzzah for our own Tina! (and sorry about the Santa suit, Teen, but Momma Matzoh just doesn't have the same recognition) note: illustrations gathered from the latest Chinook posts, so pardon omissions.

Meet the artist #42

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Anne Whiting

Why did you choose to submit this art?
 I chose to submit this art because it's a winter scene for a winter event.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being a member of SCBWI gives all of us an arena for sharing important information, support, and friendship while we pursue a love of art and literature for children.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
My favorite picture book from childhood was The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton.

Fun fact: Anne has worked in retail. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Meet the artist #41

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Nancy Foulke

Why did you choose to submit this art?
For quite a while now, I have been experimenting with night skies and clouds with moonlight shining on the landscape. I find it a challenge to paint with the duller colors of the dark yet still have clarity and light.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
It means you're able to share with other artists and writers the good and the trials. Just to be with like-minded people is priceless.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Ah, there are so many: Charlotte's Web,  although not a real picture book, had wonderful pictures along with a touching story; The Pokey Little Puppy was read to me many nights; Beatrix Potter's Tom Kitten, Peter Rabbit, and I guess my very favorite of hers, The Tale of Mrs Tiggy-Winkle. I also loved a funny little book called The Stories the Three Bears Told, illustrated by John Howard Jewett.

Fun fact: Nancy went to school in Pennsylvania. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Scribble and Scrawl, Y'all! Friday, Dec 27

Scribble And Scrawl (Kid Lit Drink Night) Tomorrow Night at Tippe and Drague Ale House, Beacon Hill! Sick of your family and visiting relatives? Had it up to here with Holiday Cheer? Bring your writing and drawing pads and/or devices to the Tippe and Drague and totally ignore your SCBWI brethren and sistern and get some real work done while sipping the beverage of your choice. Lois Brandt and Julie Paschkis are rumored to be showing up with writing prompts and illustration exercises*. SPECIAL MEMBERS-ONLY OFFER: also scheduled to appear is that woman of words whose name rhymes with Joni Sensel**. See you there at 7 or earlier. Remember that you do NOT need to actually drink alcohol, eat gluten or meat or wear animal skin on your person to attend. And the first 50 SCBWI members to show up will be given a lesson on how to pronounce "Tippe and Drague."
*totally made this up. **this part is true

Monday, December 23, 2013

Meet the artist #40

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Stacia Stojanoff

Why did you choose to submit this art?
It's a good representation of my style with whimsy, textures, and a rich color palette.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
It means having access to opportunities and being able to make choices that best suit my needs. In earlier years, I focused heavily on the illustration side of things, but recently I've discovered my love of writing. Through this transition, I've learned a lot through SCBWI.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
As a kid I remember loving Richard Scarry books. The little critters, all the details, and the labels! Everything had a name, and I loved imagining I was in that little house with them.

Fun fact: Stacia has a soft spot for sad mermaids. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Meet the artist #39

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Kevin Cain

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I did this piece as a portfolio sample. It's from Watership Down. I submitted it because it's got bunnies, and bunnies are cute. Even when they're lost in the woods in the dark of night and they fear for their lives, they're still cute. Right?

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Camaraderie, support, education, opportunity. One fine group of folks.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
I was actually a reluctant reader. One of the first picture books I remember was Put Me in the Zoo. The illustrations grabbed me. They were so different from Dr. Seuss, which apparently I thought all picture books were supposed to look like. The book that kicked me over the edge, though, was Treasure Island with N.C. Wyeth's illustrations.

Fun fact: Kevin works in colored pencil. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Sunday, December 22, 2013

Meet the artist #38

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Craig Orback

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I am excited to be illustrating a new series, Boy's Camp (Sky Pony Press), so I thought this scene from the first book would be a quintessential camp scene to promote the book. I also love painting scenes with strong lights and darks, and drawing from my own camp memories as a kid.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
I have been a member for over 10 years. It means being part of a community of like-minded artists and authors whose audience happens to be kids. It also means getting out of our isolated studios and being inspired by other work.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
My favorite book was a great collection of classic stories called The Golden Treasury of Children's Literature, with some of the best illustrators of the past 100 years.

Fun fact: Craig is a movie fan. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Meet the artist #37

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Tara Larsen Chang

Why did you choose to submit this art?
She's a little scary to keep around the house (with the eating of pets and small children, you know). I feel safer when she's hanging out elsewhere.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
I love belonging to a community of like-minded souls who are equally passionate about the art and craft of children's book-making.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
The Golden Book of Fairy Tales, illustrated by Adrienne Segur (which, to me, was the important part of book construction).

Fun fact: Tara gardens for fairies.  Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Saturday, December 21, 2013

Meet the artist #36

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

E. Sattler

Why did you choose to submit this art?
This piece was the result of a SCBWI pre-conference assignment. Plus, I liked how it turned out.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
I have found my peeps.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban. I was a picky eater.

Fun fact: This artist has been banned from a certain section of the library.  Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Meet the artist #35

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Ariel T. Smith

Why did you choose to submit this art?
This illustration for Carroll's "The Mad Gardener's Song" represents the direction in which I want my art to continue to grow. I love drawings with a touch of the comical, strange, and mildly ominous.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
SCBWI has been a tremendous source of joy, camaraderie, and inspiration. I get so much satisfaction in sharing the pursuit of children's writing/illustration with such committed artists.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
This question is so hard! Eloise was a great favorite––I especially loved the scene where she sawed her baby doll in half, then rushed to the hospital in an ambulance, and finished the dramatic scene with "Here's what I like to do / Make things up."

Fun fact: Ariel works in pen and digitally. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Suzanne's series stretches

Congrats to Suzanne Selfors, who just sold Little, Brown books #5 and #6 in her Imaginary Veterinary series, which is illustrated by Dan Santat. They'll be coming out starting in January 2015. Yay!

Friday, December 20, 2013

Meet the artist #34

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Laurie O'Keefe

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I was contacted by Sylvan Dell publishers to create the artwork for a fictional story featuring the pocket gopher as the main hero of the Mt. St. Helens eruption (Gopher to the Rescue! A Volcano Recovery Story). I am a medical illustrator by training, but I always jump at the opportunity to draw fun animal characters, so this was a good introduction into the world of children's picture-book art. Even though the story represents a fictional animal, the scientific elements had to be accurate. I made sure to represent plants and animals accurately. I think the piece picked for this show represents the best example of merging accuracy with a picture book's stylistic look.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
SCBWI is my link to the outside world from my island studio! It is a wonderful way to still feel connected.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
When I grew up, I thought "daycare" meant spending your days in the library. We did not have a library at home with books—this was the 1960s—so I checked out the same books over and over. We reserved two books constantly: Where the Wild Things Are and Parsley. Now, everyone knows the Sendak book, but Parsley (illustrated by Ludwig Bemelmans) has fallen out of circulation. I am glad I received a copy of it for my birthday some years back. I even have a beautiful bonsai tree recently planted outside that I named Parsley. If I were Queen of the Universe, there would be no such thing as a great picture book going out of print!

Fun fact: Laurie lives on Orcas Island. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

YA/MG authors with spring releases

Are there any other authors with MG/YA spring releases who would be interested in doing some joint signings/events in April? Please email Maureen McQuerry (Beyond the Door, Abrams/Amulet, March 2014) and you might be able to work something out. 
(And don't forget to send notice of your local appearances to the Chinook! We want to know!)



Meet the artist #33

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Tyler Parker

Why did you choose to submit this art?
This piece exemplifies so many of the things that I love about working in the youth market: It's fun, colorful, and based deeply in narrative. I don't really think of illustrating for children so much as drawing the things I like (be it pirates, superheroes, astronauts, or monsters). Also, I'm a huge proponent of being aware of the ways in which gender is portrayed in our industry, and I think that creating imagery that doesn't contribute to stereotypical portrayals is really important. Why does the princess want to marry a prince when she can go off and have her own adventures?

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being part of SCBWI is about knowing there are other people out there who care about the things I care about. It's a network of passionate people who want to help each other in a field that can often feel pretty competitive.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
When I was a kid, the two books my family read to me most were Giant John by Arnold Lobel and Dr. Seuss' One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish Blue Fish. The first book that I remember just outright blowing my mind was The Stinky Cheese Man by Jon Scieszka.

Fun fact: Tyler plays the ukelele. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Meet the artist #32

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Liz Wong

Why did you choose to submit this art?
There's something about drawing unreasonably angry children that I find endlessly amusing. Angry children in person? Not so great. Fictional angry children? Fun times!

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
SCBWI has been such an amazing community. I've met my critique group, made friends, celebrated successes, commiserated failures, obsessed over books, and learned an immeasurable amount about the industry and the craft of writing and illustrating. It's kept me motivated and inspired. But most importantly, it's introduced me to a world of people who love children's books just as much as I do.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Urashima Taro, a Japanese folktale lavishly illustrated by George Suyeoka, in which a young fisherman visits the kingdom of the sea princess. It's a Rip Van Winkle-like tale with a grim ending (spoiler: he dies, miserable and alone––kids love that stuff!), but the illustrations of the undersea kingdom and all its wonders captivated my imagination as a young child. It also had the bonus side effect of warping me for life!

Fun fact: Liz has climbed a mango tree. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Meet the artist #31

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Erik Brooks

Why did you choose to submit this art?
"Wolf on Top" is definitely one of my favorite paintings from any book I've illustrated. It was hard to pull off, but I love the perspective that was ultimately achieved (after MANY hours of sketching and mistakes) and the series of expressions on the animals––from the wolf who is SO excited to be on top to the bear on the bottom, who knows the whole thing is about to come crashing down around him.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
SCBWI is great. Even though I live in relative isolation––too far from Seattle to really attend regular meetings––SCBWI membership is an important mark of professionalism and interconnectedness in a career that can otherwise be very lonely. And the other authors and illustrators that I've met (too many to name)––these are my sort-of co-workers and have been excellent models on which to base a career. The group and its network structure allow for a degree of familiarity and an appreciation for other artists' work that is quite valuable. And for that I am very grateful.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Need a House? Call Ms. Mouse, by George Mendoza and illustrated by Doris Susan Smith (Grosset Dunlap, 1981) is among my favorites. A simple book about a mouse architect who builds houses for many different forest animals, I loved––and still love––the amazing details in the illustrations. Like any kid who once designed his/her own spaceship on graph paper, I couldn't help being inspired by this book.

Fun fact: Erik is a skiing coach. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Meet the artist #30

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Paul Schmid

Why did you choose to submit this art?
It is from my book, Hugs from Pearl.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Meeting people and sharing ideas.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf and illustrated by Robert Lawson.

Fun fact: Paul had a month-long fellowship with Maurice Sendak. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Meet the artist #29

You can still see SCBWI WWA art at the Washington State Convention Center through Jan. 8, or check out the art and artists online here.
 

Josh Tuininga

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I submitted "The Sunset" because it was one of the most expansive pieces from my book. The colors of the sky are very vibrant, which I thought would work well in the gallery space.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
It means a lot! I joined SCBWI because I had written and illustrated my first children's book and wanted to learn about next steps for getting it published. I received my first newsletter, discovered information about relevant publishers, and within a month got my first book published! I'm so happy I joined this community.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf and Robert Lawson.

Fun fact: Josh's studio is a converted school bus. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

Help Henny hatch!

We're positively clucking with anticipation, and it isn't because the sky is falling.

Elizabeth Rose Stanton will celebrate the launch of her picture book, Henny, which she wrote and illustrated.



Henny is an egg-ceptional creature (I know, I know--groan!) whose chicken wings give way to human arms. She's quite a character. Come join her creator Elizabeth in helping her to fly the coop and meet the reading public that's set to devour her (oops, not like that!).

Elizabeth will appear at Secret Garden Books in Ballard on Tuesday, January 7 at 7pm.









 

Craig Orback's classes

Local illustrator Craig Orback is offering a slate of new Children's Book Illustration Classes starting in January 2014. 





Here's the skinny:



Children's Book Illustration I: two locations




 
 
Children's Book Illustration II: North Seattle only



 
 
See Craig's website and blog for more information. 

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Meet the artist #28

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.
 

Elizabeth Rose Stanton

Why did you choose to submit this art?
My little chicken character, Henny, really wanted some advance attention, so she kept poking me to be in the show (which, with those little fingers of hers, she can). Henny will fly the coop on January 7, thanks to Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books––and she'll launch herself at Secret Garden Books on that very date, at 7:00 p.m. I hope you all will come!

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Pretty much everything, since I wouldn't be here without it. It's truly been the wind beneath my wings (or, in Henny's case, arms!)

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
I can't think back that far.

Fun fact: Elizabeth has a degree in architecture. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

A gift for yourself - save $10

Need a holiday gift for yourself? Renew your SCBWI membership now, whether your renewal date is here or not. Dues for our international organization will be going up $10 as of Jan. 1, but you can renew now and save that increase; a year will be added to your membership, no matter when it expires.

What are you getting for your $70 a year? (or $85 if you haven't been a member and sign up fresh)? Here's a sampling:
- The new website at scbwi.org, which, if you haven't noticed, includes new features such as the ability to post reviews of your books, links to your favorite indie for sales, links to book trailer, and much more. They're working through the bugs of the launch, such as the one that put most of us in the Western Australia region (and hey, wasn't it fun to be in Australia for a while??)
- The always-great content of the quarterly Bulletin, which you can read online or get in your mailbox. Back issues are available online and searchable by topic.
- Discounts to the great stuff we do here in Western WA -- including, for instance, our preview of the brand new documentary about the making of The Phantom Tollbooth on Thursday, Feb. 6.

There's more you can check out at scbwi.org. To renew, go to your profile and click the "Renew" option next to the date your membership expires (which is another new feature of the webite).

Meet the artist #27

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.

Andrea Taylor

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I think my "Hopping Lemur" illustration has an unexpected quality about it that captures the viewer's attention. The fresh colors, mix of animals, and unusual composition all make for a pleasing view, or at least I hope so!

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
I went to my first SCBWI monthly meeting in the fall of 2011. I was overcome with the genuine warmth and encouragement given to members. It was something I knew I wanted to be a part of.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses by Paul Goble. I'm looking at it as I write this. My copy is so worn most of the pages are falling out. I've had it since I was a baby. In fact, it was published the year of my birth. I find everything about the illustrations and story to be inspiring and beautiful.

Fun fact: Andrea studied art in Spain. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Monday, December 16, 2013

Meet the artist #26

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.

Kevan Atteberry

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I had just drawn this recently to go with a rhyming story I've been working on.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
It means camaraderie in a world that is unlike the rest of the world. It is connections and friendships and truckloads of information.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Whenever I am asked this question, Horton Hears a Who! and Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose come to mind. I don't know if they were my favorites, but they left some kind of impression on me...

Fun fact: Kevan has illustrated a number of other authors' books but also recently sold his own stories in a two-book book deal! Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Meet the artist #25

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.
 

Andrea Lawson

Why did you choose to submit this art?
"Air Travel" is one of my newer pictures. I love drawing critters flying around. Flying is one of my themes. I have  done several other pieces, including "Ways of Flying" and "The Wing Store." It's probably because I wish I could fly — I could get to the SCBWI meetings a lot quicker than I do with all that driving and ferrying from the Olympic Peninsula!.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
All I can say is that I love SCBWI. I have learned so much about craft and publishing since I joined. But the real and main reason is that I love the wonderful, fun people. I have found my element. Where else can you go to a meeting and sit with fellow members wearing bear, pirate, and space suits? Definitely it's the fashion-conscious members.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
That is a hard question, as I have so many favorites. I'll Be You and You Be Me, by Ruth Krauss, illustrated by Maurice Sendak. And The Golden Bunny and Other Stories by Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by Leonard Weisgard.

Fun fact: Andrea's paintings and prints are in a collection in Denmark, among others! Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

First Book excitement

Heroines: Bonny, Sam, Kathryn, Wendy, & Nancy

A contingent of SCBWI WWA authors and illustrators helped excite kids about books on Dec. 9, when they helped First Book distribute free 2000 books to K-2 children at a Seattle elementary school. Samantha Vamos, Bonny Becker, Kathryn Dennis, Wendy Wahman and Nancy White Carlstrom helped encourage the children, many of whom have never had a book of their own, to read and to be excited about the doors to their futures that reading can open. 

Julie Riley, one of the event organizers, said, "Thank you for helping me to find the wonderful and talented women who came to help us out at our reading event this week. Their creative and beautiful books helped us to get the kids excited about reading, and we heart SCBWI Western Washington!"

Sunday, December 15, 2013

Illustrator wanted

Lee Pasquarella has written five bedtime stories for grandchildren and would like to talk with an illustrator about obtaining art for them. As always, anyone interested should get clear information and agree about payment, expectations, rights, timing, and other contractual details (including a written contract) in advance. If you're interested in building your portfolio this way, contact Lee at ltp@msn.com or 206-369-0245.

Meet the artist #24

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.

Kjersten Anna Hayes

Why did you choose to submit this art?
I like yellow. It’s yellow. Owls are hip right now. I thought it was a strong piece from my recent work. (The truth is I have no idea how to answer this.)

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being a part of SCBWI means getting to hang out with other people who don’t raise an eyebrow when the conversation, in all seriousness, turns to discussing a main character who is a chicken.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
My favorite picture book from childhood is either The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats or Charlie Needs a Cloak by Tommie dePaola. Every time I looked through The Snowy Day as a kid, I felt (and still feel) transported to the best of my Minnesota childhood: adrift in a magically simple, lovely, snowy day. And being a crafty kid, I loved the simple story of Charlie making a new cloak from scratch. The book made me daydream about heavenly activities like weaving with pretty yarn on a real loom.

Fun fact: Kjersten, who often goes by KJ, spent two years living in Malaysia. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here. (But she has no As in her first name; that's a slip on our part. Sorry, KJ!)

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Saturday, December 14, 2013

WA/OH Scribble & Scrawl KLDN

Last chance!

Missed too many 2013 KidLit Drink Nights? Made every one and don't want to break your record? Want to ring out the year in style? Here's your last ever (in 2013) chance to rub elbows with your creative family — SCBWI WWA's first interstate KLDN! (Well, not really, but who's checking?) Washington and Ohio will enhance interstate relations when the icy Midwestern state sends emissary Joni Sensel to raise a cider in her home turf (more or less). Illustrators are requested to provide informal, peek-over-their-shoulders entertainment, since notebooks, drawing supplies, and writing supplies are welcome. Writers are dared to do the same and see if they can get a complete sentence written in that environment.

"Y'all gonna come and see me then, right, hon?" asks Joni, Ohio Exile. (Everyone in Ohio says "hon.") "I miss you!"

Friday, Dec. 27, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Tippe & Drague Alehouse
3315 Beacon Ave. S.

Don't miss the last KLDN of 2013!

Meet the artist #23

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.

Kate Rose Johnson

Why did you choose to submit this art?

I have been drawing anthropomorphic critters for my Encyclopedia of Unusual Animals and this one just really rang clear and, honestly, made people laugh––which is all I really want to do at the end of the day with my work. Coming from a traditional figurative art background, I'm still working to define my illustration style.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being part of SCBWI means that I am stretching myself to learn from people in the field and make new connections while commiserating and celebrating the long, arduous process that is writing and illustrating a book.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Without hesitation, Robert McCloskey's Time of Wonder. It is a tender, secretive experience shared between author, reader, and audience that is unmatched. I will look forward to hearing that story as much at 80 (with failing eyesight) as I did at seven with my sisters, all of us like a warm pile of baby seals laying across one another in bed, feeling the passing of time and the darkening of night and fighting to slow the turning of the pages.

Fun fact: Kate's bio says she's indescribable, but you can still learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Friday, December 13, 2013

Miscellaneous kidlit news

Submitted by Street Team member Lois Brandt 

Meet the artist #22

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.

Jill Iversen

Why did you choose to submit this piece of art?

I thought "Goldie Catches A Quick Bite" was one of my best drawings.  Also, I am working on a book called Goldie Hatches A Brood, from which this was taken.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being a member of SCBWI both challenges me and gives me confidence.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Like so many others will say, it is hard to name just one. But I do love Beatrix Potter's The Fierce Bad Rabbit.

Fun fact: Jill has done work for the Girl Scouts. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

EDGE deadline for writers

Take note!

The 2014 EDGE Professional Development Program for Literary Artists will take place in Seattle from February 28–April 12, 2014.

Would you like to be a part of it?

The deadline for applications is December 23. That's less than two weeks!

Artist Trust's EDGE program provides an in-depth curriculum led by experienced professionals, and includes special presentations, panel discussions, and assignments. There will also be a focus on entrepreneurial skills and other tools necessary to succeed in the profession.

Who's eligible? Emerging or mid-career writers of poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction. Applicants must be residents of Washington State, but cannot be students enrolled in a graduate or undergraduate degree program. Applicants must commit to completing the entire 50-hour program. Tuition is for Artist Trust members only and is $500 per participant. 

For all the details and application instructions, click this link.

 



Special announcement!

We're adding a meeting to our schedule of events!
That's right. Bonus!
On Thursday, February 6, from 7–9pm at Demaray Hall on the SPU campus, we'll be screening a brand new documentary about the making of The Phantom Tollbooth and the collaboration between author Norton Juster and illustrator Jules Feiffer. 
This is not to be missed. Put it on your calendars! More details will follow.

Meet the artist #21

Okay, maybe you blew it. Maybe you missed our awesome Winter Celebration. Fear not! Whether you joined the fun or not, you can still see the art through Jan. 8, and you can still read our mini-profiles of many featured SCBWI WWA artists. Or check them ALL out online here.

Robyn Chance 

Why did you choose to submit this piece of art?

I submitted five illustrations for consideration. The piece that was chosen, “A Tender Moment,” is from my new project Animal Stories. I submitted this because it seems to really move people, and it invites the viewer into a touching story without the use of words. It is one of my favorite pieces.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being a member of SCWBI has been a fantastic experience for myriad reasons. I have learned a great deal about the art of storytelling, marketing, and perseverance. I have also formed some great relationships and have been given the opportunity to get my work out there. I constantly encourage people who are interested in writing and creating art for young readers to join up. It is soooo worth it!

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
I loved a story called The Cookie Tree about  a tree that shows up in a medieval town and begins growing delicious cookies. Nobody knows why. They are all suspicious and have a bunch of meetings to discuss what should be done with the tree. The children, in the meantime, go out and begin eating and collecting the glorious cookies. After the children have gratefully enjoyed the tree's offerings, it disappears. The adults aren’t sure what happened, but the children are.
I also loved Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Where the Wild Things Are, Chicken Soup with Rice, and Bread and Jam for Frances. (There is obviously a food theme going on here!)

Fun fact: Robyn signs her work with a chop. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Meet the artist #20

Our Dec. 12 Winter Celebration is TODAY! (More info and registration here.) Get ready for the fun with more mini-profiles of the SCBWI-WWA artists featured at that event at the Washington State Convention Center. Or check them ALL out online here. See you tonight!

Dana Sullivan

Why did you choose to submit your particular piece of art?
My picture is from the book dummy of Kay Kay's Alphabet Safari, which I should be working on right this minute, because all the final art is due in February. It's still in the sketching and getting-approval-from-the-art-director stage, so I'm starting to sweat. When rock-star illustrator Sophie Blackall critiqued this image at our conference last April, she said Kay Kay's elbows were "too nipply," which only made me like the image more.

What does SCBWI mean to you?
Pretty much everything having to do with getting published I can thank SCBWI for. The organization has taught me so much, thrust me into the company of such an accomplished and generous group of people, and introduced me to my beloved agent, Anna Olswanger. And there will be cookies at the December Winter Celebration, so it just keeps on giving.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
One of my favorite childhood book collections was The Nutshell Library, by Maurice Sendak. It was this incredibly cute little box with four small books inside: One Was Johnny, Alligators All Around, Pierre, and Chicken Soup With Rice. They were like a secret shelf of books I could take with me and read wherever I was. Reading once, reading twice, reading chicken soup with rice!

Fun fact: Dana, aka D2 in our region, grew up with one of those gender-switching names, and it has permanently affected his sense of humor. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Meet the artist #19

Our Dec. 12 Winter Celebration is TODAY! (More info and registration here.) Get ready for the fun with more mini-profiles of the SCBWI-WWA artists featured at that event at the Washington State Convention Center. Or check them ALL out online here. See you tonight!

Mike Cressy

Why did you choose to submit your particular piece of art?
Fresh off winning an award for my Super Alphabet poster at the Society of Illustrators Los Angeles annual show, I thought it would be a good choice. But then I thought that an alternative idea for a picture book, featuring space aliens as different parts of the alphabet, might be cool. So I sent it in. It's more fun than the Super Alphabet poster. Not better, but more fun.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Having been a member of SCBWI for at least 15 or 16 years now, I remember going to the international conference in Los Angeles and thinking that the people who attended, with a few exceptions, were very friendly, fun people who did their best not only to find a way to publish their work but to help others find their way into the publishing world. That remains true today. I've worked in many different commercial art areas, and this group is by far the best to work with. I can see myself being a member till the end of my days.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Growing up in a household of five kids left me with very little time to read. But I had stacks of well-illustrated books in my corner of the room, and I've got a few favorites from that time. One is The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins by Dr. Seuss. Another is Homer Price by Robert McCloskey.

Fun fact: Mike has done design or illustration work for everyone from Disney to Playboy. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Tonight's the night!

Art by Dana Sullivan

It's here. Our Winter Celebration. The party, exhibit, and cookie-fest of the year! 

By now, your eyes are blurred from our flurry of reminders and factoids. But because we love you, and want to see you, here are several eensy-weensy tidbits to keep in mind before you hit the road:

1. If you just changed your mind, or your plans changed, and HEY! YOU'RE COMING AT THE LAST MINUTE, please note that you cannot register for this event online via the Cvent invitation you received way back in the fall. The online preregistration period closed last week, but never fear! You can pay at the door (again: $20 SCBWI WWA members, $25 for non-members).

2. If you're bringing COOKIES, please feel free (pretty please!) to bring along a written recipe so those of us who become your insta-fans can try out your delectables in the comforts of our own kitchens. Not required, but hey, knowledge is power (and cravings can be mighty powerful as well)!

3. There will be an EVENING PARKING RATE for the Convention Center. (We think it's $6, but don't quote us. At least it's an after-hours rate, right?)

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Meet the artist #18

Our Dec. 12 Winter Celebration is tomorrow! (More info and registration here.) Get ready for the fun with more mini-profiles of the SCBWI-WWA artists featured at that event at the Washington State Convention Center. Or check them ALL out online here. See you soon!

Sarah Romano Diehl

Why did you choose to submit your particular piece of art?
I was happy with the mood and symbolism of the piece I chose. I think it is one of my stronger illustrations.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being a part of SCBWI has meant so many things: not only have I learned so much about the art and  business sides of making children's books, but I have also made friendships with people I feel a real connection with because we share so many interests.


What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
If I have to choose one: Mr. Dog: The Dog Who Belonged to Himself, written by Margaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Garth Williams.

Fun fact: Sarah earned her Wild West chops in Colorado. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

NaNo revisions?

For those of you ready to submit 2013 NaNoWriMo novels to an agent or editor, first ask yourself if your manuscript is sufficiently polished. How polished? Well, for comparison, here's bestseller Bruce Coville with his revisions for Always October...

Submitted by Street Team member Lois Brandt

Must-read for authors

Dear colleague,

As I enter the last few months of my time as Guild president, I have a favor to ask.

Richard Russo has written a letter that I'd like you to share with an author you know who isn't yet a member of the Guild. The letter follows, and speaks eloquently for itself. Simply forward this message on to a friend.

I'm happy to report that the Guild has never had more members in its 100-year history. Even so, we are beginning a process of self-renewal for the Guild. Rick's letter is the first step in that process, in which we are determined to explain our benefit to all authors in the U.S., and hopefully, draw in many more.

Many thanks, and best wishes for a warm holiday season.

Scott Turow
 
 

 
An Open Letter to My Fellow Authors

It’s all changing, right before our eyes. Not just publishing, but the writing life itself, our ability to make a living from authorship. Even in the best of times, which these are not, most writers have to supplement their writing incomes by teaching, or throwing up sheet-rock, or cage fighting. It wasn’t always so, but for the last two decades I’ve lived the life most writers dream of: I write novels and stories, as well as the occasional screenplay, and every now and then I hit the road for a week or two and give talks. In short, I’m one of the blessed, and not just in terms of my occupation. My health is good, my children grown, their educations paid for. I’m sixty-four, which sucks, but it also means that nothing that happens in publishing—for good or ill—is going to affect me nearly as much as it affects younger writers, especially those who haven’t made their names yet. Even if the e-price of my next novel is $1.99, I won’t have to go back to cage fighting.
 
Still, if it turns out that I’ve enjoyed the best the writing life has to offer, that those who follow, even the most brilliant, will have to settle for less, that won’t make me happy and I suspect it won’t cheer other writers who’ve been as fortunate as I. It’s these writers, in particular, that I’m addressing here. Not everyone believes, as I do, that the writing life is endangered by the downward pressure of e-book pricing, by the relentless, ongoing erosion of copyright protection, by the scorched-earth capitalism of companies like Google and Amazon, by spineless publishers who won’t stand up to them, by the “information wants to be free” crowd who believe that art should be cheap or free and treated as a commodity, by internet search engines who are all too happy to direct people to on-line sites that sell pirated (read “stolen”) books, and even by militant librarians who see no reason why they shouldn’t be able to “lend” our e-books without restriction. But those of us who are alarmed by these trends have a duty, I think, to defend and protect the writing life that’s been good to us, not just on behalf of younger writers who will not have our advantages if we don’t, but also on behalf of readers, whose imaginative lives will be diminished if authorship becomes untenable as a profession.

I know, I know. Some insist that there’s never been a better time to be an author. Self-publishing has democratized the process, they argue, and authors can now earn royalties of up to seventy percent, where once we had to settle for what traditional publishers told us was our share. Anecdotal evidence is marshaled in support of this view (statistical evidence to follow). Those of us who are alarmed, we’re told, are, well, alarmists. Time will tell who’s right, but surely it can’t be a good idea for writers to stand on the sidelines while our collective fate is decided by others. Especially when we consider who those others are. Entities like Google and Apple and Amazon are rich and powerful enough to influence governments, and every day they demonstrate their willingness to wield that enormous power. Books and authors are a tiny but not insignificant part of the larger battle being waged between these companies, a battleground that includes the movie, music, and newspaper industries. I think it’s fair to say that to a greater or lesser degree, those other industries have all gotten their asses kicked, just as we’re getting ours kicked now. And not just in the courts. Somehow, we’re even losing the war for hearts and minds. When we defend copyright, we’re seen as greedy. When we justly sue, we’re seen as litigious. When we attempt to defend the physical book and stores that sell them, we’re seen as Luddites. Our altruism, when we’re able to summon it, is too often seen as self-serving.

But here’s the thing. What the Apples and Googles and Amazons and Netflixes of the world all have in common (in addition to their quest for world domination), is that they’re all starved for content, and for that they need us. Which means we have a say in all this. Everything in the digital age may feel new and may seem to operate under new rules, but the conversation about the relationship between art and commerce is age-old, and artists must be part of it. To that end we’d do well to speak with one voice, though it’s here we demonstrate our greatest weakness. Writers are notoriously independent cusses, hard to wrangle. We spend our mostly solitary days filling up blank pieces of paper with words. We must like it that way, or we wouldn’t do it. But while it’s pretty to think that our odd way of life will endure, there’s no guarantee. The writing life is ours to defend. Protecting it also happens to be the mission of the Authors Guild, which I myself did not join until last year, when the light switch in my cave finally got tripped. Are you a member? If not, please consider becoming one. We’re badly outgunned and in need of reinforcements. If the writing life has done well by you, as it has by me, here’s your chance to return the favor. Do it now, because there’s such a thing as being too late.

Richard Russo
December 2013
 
 
 
 
 

Just thinkin' about...tomorrow!

Art by Dana Sullivan


Tomorrow night. SCBWI WWA's fabulous Winter Celebration. 6-9pm. WA State Convention Center. Art, cookies, good news, good friends, and good tidings. (There is going to be so much fun that Madeline herself will risk being grounded by Miss Clavel in order to partake in the festivities!)

Lest you forget: 

––There will be door prize drawings beginning at 6:30pm, and they'll continue throughout the evening.

––Not to be outdone by the prizes and the treats, there will also be a book swap. Bring a book, pick a book, and those left over will find a new home at Friends of the Seattle Public Library sale or a deserving school.

––Cookie concerns? If you're not sure how many to make, 2-3 dozen is puh-lenty. Please bring them before 6:30pm. Those bringing contested comestibles will be directed to the setup area. The contest will close at 7pm, so the judges' tasting may commence.

––Parking panic? The Convention Center parking can be found at 8th and Pike, under the CC. Take the elevator or escalator to the Second Floor Galleria. Which is where we'll be. (There will also be signs, if you get off track.) Check out this map if you're really confused. 



We hope to see as many of you as possible, and yes, you may form two straight lines!

Illustrating Nelson Mandela

As the world has been collectively celebrating the life of Nelson Mandela, illustrators might be particularly interested in this BBC video of artist Kadir Nelson talking about his illustrations of Mandela for both the New Yorker and his recent picture book about Mandela. There's also a nice write-up on the New Yorker's online blog about the Mandela cover illustration, along with a slide-show from Kadir's book.

-Post contributed by Kjersten Anna Hayes

Meet the artist #17

Our Dec. 12 Winter Celebration is tomorrow! (More info and registration here.) Get ready for the fun with more mini-profiles of the SCBWI-WWA artists featured at that event at the Washington State Convention Center. Or check them ALL out online here. See you soon!

Nicole Allin

Why did you choose to submit your particular piece of art?
Tiger's in Trouble! is one of my favorite pieces, and one I really wanted to share. And really, who wouldn't want to see a tiger painting the town red (and blue, and green, and pink, and yellow...)?

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Being part of SCBWI is being part of a fantastic, supportive community. It's great to know that when I have questions, SCBWI's wealth of information and people willing to help are there.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
My favorite book when I was small was The Monster at the End of This Book by Jon Stone and Michael Smollin. It's still a favorite book, even now that I'm big!

Fun fact: Ask Nicole about steampunk knitting books. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Meet the artist #16

Our Dec. 12 Winter Celebration is just days away! (More info and registration here.) Get ready for the fun with more mini-profiles of the SCBWI-WWA artists featured at that event at the Washington State Convention Center. Or check them ALL out online here. See you on Thursday evening!

Kathryn Dennis

Why did you choose to submit your particular piece of art?
It is a final scene in a picture book I am working on. Urban birds are having to change their tunes to be heard above the city noise. The birds have gathered in one tree and for the first time, the loudest sound in the city is the birdsong.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
It has been like a mentor. I have learned what to do and, more importantly, what not to do.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
Frederick, by Leo Lionni. I love that a little mouse stored memories of sunshine, colors, and words to survive the winter.

Fun fact: Kathryn began her career as an advertising art director. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

UW Writing for Children class


Calling all children's writers:
Registration is now open for Intermediate Writing for Children at the University of Washington, part of the UW Writing for Children Certificate program. (You can jump in mid-year to the certificate program if space is available, and this year, it is!) If you are a writer with basic knowledge about children's books, and the beginnings of a manuscript, but you've always wanted to delve deeper into your craft, this is the class for you! 
We'll study the work of accomplished children's writers and have visits from three local picture book and YA authors, as well as the acquiring editor for the new Sasquatch children's book line. Each session in this 10-week course focuses on a different craft topic, from plot, to character development to setting, to dialogue, offering a mini-workshop chock full of writing exercises. You'll also work on your own manuscripts and get lots of constructive feedback through weekly critique groups and the chance to turn your draft in for a critique from me. 
Class starts January 7. Register now before it fills up!  

Two days until....

Art by Dana Sullivan

"And now," said Max, "let the delicious cookies be eaten!"

Will you come help us eat them? Please? Pretty please with sprinkles on top? Come join the rumpus this Thursday night, Dec. 12, and stuff your brain with good news and your mouth with good eats, and hey, we can't help but promise a monstrously good time!

Two days. Forty-eight hours. (More info and registration here.) Be there, and be wild.

Meet the artist #15

Our Dec. 12 Winter Celebration is just days away! (More info and registration here.) Get ready for the fun with more mini-profiles of the SCBWI-WWA artists featured at that event at the Washington State Convention Center. Or check them ALL out online here. See you on Thursday evening!

Julie Paschkis

Why did you choose to submit your particular piece of art?
I chose the first page of Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People because I loved painting it. That was the painting where I figured out how to illustrate that book.

What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
Working on books is a solitary occupation. SCBWI brings us together. It was an incredibly helpful resource when I was first getting started. Now it feels like a big family reunion.

Years ago someone told me that children's book illustration is a "bunny eat bunny world." But our SCBWI chapter disproves that: it's a bunny help bunny world. A much better idea.

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
My favorite picture book was The Poppyseed Cakes by Maud and Miska Petersham. I also loved Millions of Cats by Wanda Gag, and Pelle's New Suit by Elsa Beskow.

Fun fact: Julie is also a textile designer with her own fabrics. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.

Monday, December 9, 2013

Meet the artist #14

Our Dec. 12 Winter Celebration is just days away! (More info and registration here.) Get ready for the fun with more mini-profiles of the SCBWI-WWA artists featured at that event at the Washington State Convention Center. Or check them ALL out online here. See you on Thursday evening!

Dana Arnim

Why did you choose to submit your particular piece of art?
I submitted a group of images that I felt good about and that had received good feedback from art directors at conferences.
 
What does being part of SCBWI mean to you?
I really love being part of SCBWI. Knowing so many great creative people, interacting with them, getting company and encouragement, and creating opportunities for inspiration is what SCBWI is about for me. (Plus Dana Sullivan's cartoons and drawings. That guy cracks me up!)

What is your favorite picture book from childhood?
One book does stand out that I read over and over. I never tired of intensely scrutinizing the art for precious details: The Big Golden Book of Elves & Fairies, illustrated by Garth Williams. I still have my childhood copy and remember wishing myself into those stories and settings.

Fun fact: Dana is a card-carrying computer jockey, too, and spent (mumble) years as SCBWI WWA's webmaster before becoming co-regional advisor. Learn more, and see more images, on STQRY here.

*excluding only those lazy bones or privacy freaks who don't answer our email questions, of course. We love them anyway.