Saturday, December 5, 2009

YA writers: you have to read this

Here's an excerpt from the TIME magazine book critic's view on adult novels:

There was a time when difficult literature was exciting. T.S. Eliot once famously read to a whole football stadium full of fans. And it's still exciting—when Eliot does it. But in contemporary writers it has just become a drag. Which is probably why millions of adults are cheating on the literary novel with the young-adult novel, where the unblushing embrace of storytelling is allowed, even encouraged. Sales of hardcover young-adult books are up 30.7% so far this year, through June, according to the Association of American Publishers, while adult hardcovers are down 17.8%. Nam Le's "The Boat," one of the best-reviewed books of fiction of 2008, has sold 16,000 copies in hardcover and trade paperback, according to Nielsen Bookscan (which admittedly doesn't include all book retailers). In the first quarter of 2009 alone, the author of the "Twilight" series, Stephenie Meyer, sold eight million books. What are those readers looking for? You'll find critics who say they have bad taste, or that they're lazy and can't hack it in the big leagues. But that's not the case. They need something they're not getting elsewhere. Let's be honest: Why do so many adults read Suzanne Collins's young-adult novel "The Hunger Games" instead of contemporary literary fiction? Because "The Hunger Games" doesn't bore them.

And here's a larger bit of analysis on the importance of plot/story in the novel. It's not totally new--Michael Chabon was on his horse about this a few years back. But it's still worth a read.

1 comment:

Eric said...

Suzanne Collin's the Hunger Games is one of the best books I have ever read. We finally learned the release date of the third book in the series and I am counting down the seconds.

-Eric
http://themockingjay.vndv.com